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Download Basic Principles of Textile Coloration by Arthur D. Broadbent PDF

By Arthur D. Broadbent

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This is a powerful oxidising agent that destroys the natural colouring matters present in cotton without undue oxidative damage to the fibres. Any residue of starch in the cotton is rapidly oxidised by the hydrogen peroxide used in bleaching so that the peroxide is less effective in destroying undesirable coloured impurities. In addition, residual starch can also reduce some dyes during dyeing, particularly under alkaline conditions, resulting in decreased colour depth. Hydrogen peroxide has largely replaced solutions of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) as a bleaching agent, since the latter chemical requires careful pH and temperature control during bleaching to avoid oxidising the cotton.

In some cases, molecules with permanent dipoles can exert attractive forces on neighbouring non-polar molecules by polarising their electrons. The electropositive end of a dipole attracts and polarises the electrons in a bond between two atoms in a neighbouring molecule while the electronegative end of the dipole becomes attracted to the neighbouring atom’s more exposed nucleus. Dipole–dipole and dipole-induced dipole bonds are weak and only significant when molecules are in close contact. They are therefore continually being broken and reformed as molecules collide.

It is most common when a fabric made of synthetic fibres has a yellow cast from over-heating, or has picked up dirt during manufacture. The process is much milder than for natural fibres. 3). p65 31 27/07/01, 10:08 32 FIBRES AND TEXTILES: PROPERTIES AND PROCESSING absorbed energy into a visible blue-violet fluorescence in the 400–500 nm region. This emission of light offsets the absorption of the fibres in this wavelength region, even producing an effect where the reflected light plus the fluorescence causes more visible light to leave the fabric surface than is apparently incident upon it.

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